Outcomes

Comparisons are high-dose dexamethasone vs. prednisone:

Primary Outcomes:

  • OR, n (%): 78 (82.1) vs. 67 (69.1), P=0.044 (dexamethasone superior)
  • SR, n (%): 38 (40.0) vs. 40 (41.2), P= 0.884

Secondary Outcomes:

  • Efficacy
    • CR, n (%): 48 (50.5) vs. 26 (26.8), P=0.001 (dexamethasone superior)
    • Sustained CR, n (%): 26 (27.4) vs. 17 (17.5), P=0.120
    • Median time to response (TTR), d (range): 3 (1-9) vs. 6 (2-24), P=0.001 (dexamethasone superior)
    • Bleeding events: 12 vs. 25, P=0.028 (dexamethasone superior)
  • Safety
    • Both treatments were well-tolerated in general. The frequency of adverse events was higher in the prednisone arm, especially with cushingoid appearance and weight gain in > 10% of the patients. Several other adverse events were observed in > 5% of patients in each arm, including insomnia and mood disorders in the high-dose dexamethasone arm and dizziness, hyperglycemia, hypertension, insomnia, and peptic ulcer disease in the prednisone arm.
Figure 2.from the article. Kaplan-Meier estimates of the duration of response. The Kaplan-Meier curve demonstrated comparable long-term outcomes between the 2 arms (P = .522). HD, high-dose dexamethasone. PDN, prednisone.
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